Southern Gold

  1. Southern Quarter Eagle 1852-60

    Southern Quarter Eagle 1852-60

    Southern Mint Quarter Eagles
    1852 — 1860

    Authored by Jeff Garrett

    1852-C
    Mintage: 9,772
    Graded NGC: 91 Total, Mint State 8, Finest MS62 (1)

    The mintage for the year would indicate that the 1852-C Liberty Head quarter eagle is a scarce issue. That is surely the case, as just a few examples are offered for sale each year. Most of the known coins are in the Extremely Fine to About Uncirculated range. Mint State coins are very rare and when available are probably on the low end of the scale. The finest example known at this point again seems to be a Harry W. Bass Jr. coin, which was certified as MS-63 and sold in 1999 for $26,450. Bass had a keen eye for quality, and when offered the opportunity would purchase a coin to upgrade a date that he already possessed. The date is found with the usual maladies common on Charlotte Mint gold coinage: weak strike, clashed dies, rough planchets.

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  2. Southern Quarter Eagle 1847-51

    Southern Quarter Eagle 1847-51

    Southern Mint Quarter Eagles
    1847 — 1851

    Authored by Jeff Garrett

    This issue we explore the second half of the Southern Quarter Eagles struck from 1847 to 1860. This group is rich in interesting and rare coins. Southern gold coins have become very popular in recent years. There is tremendous demand for original, problem free examples. Whether you are trying to complete the entire set or just looking for an interesting coin to add to your collection, hopefully the following information will prove helpful.

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  3. Southern Gold Dollars 1849-61

    Southern Gold Dollars 1849-61

    Southern Gold Dollars

    Authored by Jeff Garrett

    An overview of Southern gold dollars issues from 1849 to 1861.

    1849-C, Closed Wreath
    Mintage: 11,634
    Graded NGC: 99 total, Mint State 31, Finest MS64 (2)

    The 1849-C Closed Wreath variety can be considered quite scarce in any grade. High grade examples are usually prooflike in appearance but can be difficult to grade due to convex obverse fields (giving the coin a bulged look), which can be confused with damage. Low grade pieces are the norm, with Mint State coins being very rare. The 1849-C Closed Wreath design is scarce in all grades, but it is the only collectible Charlotte Mint gold dollar for the year that is practical to collect. The finest example seen is an MS64 coin that was discovered by me in 2014, and later sold at auction in 2015 for $49,350.

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  4. Collecting Southern Gold

    Collecting Southern Gold

    Collecting Southern Gold

    Authored by Jeff Garrett

    Contrary to popular belief, the first significant discovery of gold in America was not in California in 1848, but in the lower Piedmont area of North Carolina in 1799. Conrad Reed, the son of a local farmer, found a 17-pound, yellow-colored rock that later turned out to be gold (after it served a three-year stint as a doorstop!). By the early 1830’s. the Bechtler family had established a private mint at Rutherford, North Carolina. Sufficient gold was found in the area to justify the opening of an official, U.S. branch mint at Charlotte, North Carolina in 1838.

    Around 1828, another gold rush began when gold was discovered in an obscure area of northern Georgia (once part of the Cherokee nation). By 1830, an average of 300 ounces of gold a day was being produced in the area. Private minters such as Templeton Reid and the Bechtler family produced their own coins from locally mined gold. In response, the U.S. Mint established a branch mint at nearby Dahlonega, Georgia to convert the raw gold into standardized coins.

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